IUBio Biosequences .. Software .. Molbio soft .. Network News .. FTP

Human study: Clioquinol stops Alzheimer's disease

k p Collins kpaulc at [----------]earthlink.net
Tue Jan 13 04:53:40 EST 2004


I discussed a bit more [for folks who are
familiar with other stuff that I've discussed],
but the 'main point' is that a generalized
'washing' of zinc and copper ions won't
cure Alzheimer's - unless the occurrence
of zinc and copper ions within the brain
is, itself, due to a disease eleswhere. [I
should have looked things up before I
posted my reply, but I'm 'tired', and it
doesn't actually make a difference, any-
way.]

Cheers, Suzanne, ken

"Suzanne Gall" <suzannegall at rogers.com> wrote in message
news:zeKMb.2941$ZuL1.2560 at twister01.bloor.is.net.cable.rogers.com...
> Thanks for the info - but what's your point?  In layman's terms please.
>
> "k p Collins" <kpaulc@[----------]earthlink.net> wrote in message
> news:D9JMb.5155$q4.1649 at newsread3.news.atl.earthlink.net...
> > If one takes action that indiscriminantly 'blocks' the
> > normal functions of zinc and copper ions, then one
> > is blocking more than the roles that these ions play
> > in the formation of 'plaques'.
> >
> > In my view, Alsheimer's results from larger dynamics
> > in which the 3-D energydynamics that 'normally'
> > focus selective addressing of the DNA-RNA are
> > prematurely terminated, yielding incompletely-
> > formed 'protein'-scraps that are what the "plaques"
> > are.
> >
> > This's a classic instance of 'inability' to achieve
> > sufficient TD E/I-minimization in which molecular-
> > 'level' 3-D energydynamics are prematurely-
> > terminated be-cause TD E/I-minimization does
> > not procede to 'completion' - it's a "pawling" [AoK,
> > Ap5]deficit within the TD E/I-minimization mech-
> > anisms as they are discussed in AoK.
> >
> > The treatment that will work will re-establish the
> > normal DNA-RNA-tuning durations by re-establish-
> > ing the 'normal' functional-scopes of TD E/I-mini-
> > mization.
> >
> > Look for the "pawling" deficit, and its causes.
> >
> > Blanket-blocking of this or that ion's action will
> > not work.
> >
> > k. p. collins
> >
> > "Hua Kul" <gmp at adres.nl> wrote in message
> > news:3da4c6e5.0401121755.7cecf1af at posting.google.com...
> > > (The following is from the thread
> > >
> >
>
http://groups.google.com/groups?hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&threadm=afe2faf1
> >
>
.0308141829.d00f6d2%40posting.google.com&rnum=2&prev=/groups%3Fhl%3Den%26lr%
> >
>
3D%26ie%3DUTF-8%26oe%3DUTF-8%26q%3Dclioquinol%26btnG%3DGoogle%2BSearch%26met
> > a%3Dgroup%253Dsci.life-extension)
> > >
> > > > Tim Tyler (tim at tt1.org)
> > > > Subject: Re: Copper & Alzheimer's Disease
> > >
> > > > A report of a previous study:
> > >
> > > > ``Research teams at Harvard Medical School, the University of
> Melbourne,
> > > >   and Prana Biotechnology Ltd in Australia are working
collaboratively
> > on
> > > >   giving Alzheimer's-prone mice copper chelators, substances that
sop
> up
> > > >   metals and eliminate them from the body. These new metal-binding
> drugs
> > > >   effectively "melted" the amyloid plaques in living mice in as
little
> > as
> > > >   nine weeks, and are now in clinical trials with Alzheimer's
> > > >   patients. Results of the first of these drugs, clioquinol, should
be
> > > >   known within 12 months, and further trials of this approach are
> > > >   currently in preparation.''
> > >
> > > >  - http://www.infoaging.org/d-alz-9-r-metals.html
> > > > --
> > > __________
> > > >  |im |yler  http://timtyler.org/  tim at tt1.org
> > >
> > >
> > > Here is a small study indicating clioquinol virtually halted
> > > progression of moderate AD in humans.
> > >
> > > ====================================================================
> > > 1: Arch Neurol. 2003 Dec;60(12):1685-91.  Related Articles, Links
> > >
> > > Comment in:
> > > Arch Neurol. 2003 Dec;60(12):1678-9.
> > >
> > > Metal-protein attenuation with iodochlorhydroxyquin (clioquinol)
> > > targeting Abeta amyloid deposition and toxicity in Alzheimer disease:
> > > a pilot phase 2 clinical trial.
> > >
> > > Ritchie CW, Bush AI, Mackinnon A, Macfarlane S, Mastwyk M, MacGregor
> > > L, Kiers L, Cherny R, Li QX, Tammer A, Carrington D, Mavros C,
> > > Volitakis I, Xilinas M, Ames D, Davis S, Beyreuther K, Tanzi RE,
> > > Masters CL.
> > >
> > > Departments of Pathology, The University of Melbourne, The Mental
> > > Health Research Institute of Victoria, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.
> > >
> > > BACKGROUND: Alzheimer disease (AD) may be caused by the toxic
> > > accumulation of beta-amyloid (Abeta). OBJECTIVE: To test this theory,
> > > we developed a clinical intervention using clioquinol, a
> > > metal-protein-attenuating compound (MPAC) that inhibits zinc and
> > > copper ions from binding to Abeta, thereby promoting Abeta dissolution
> > > and diminishing its toxic properties. METHODS: A pilot phase 2
> > > clinical trial in patients with moderately severe Alzheimer disease.
> > > RESULTS: Thirty-six subjects were randomized. The effect of treatment
> > > was significant in the more severely affected group (baseline
> > > cognitive subscale score of the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale,
> > > >/=25), due to a substantial worsening of scores in those taking
> > > placebo compared with minimal deterioration for the clioquinol group.
> > > Plasma Abeta42 levels declined in the clioquinol group and increased
> > > in the placebo group. Plasma zinc levels rose in the
> > > clioquinol-treated group. The drug was well tolerated. CONCLUSION:
> > > Subject to the usual caveats inherent in studies with small sample
> > > size, this pilot phase 2 study supports further investigation of this
> > > novel treatment strategy using a metal-protein-attenuating compound.
> > >
> > > Publication Types:
> > > Clinical Trial
> > > Clinical Trial, Phase II
> > > Randomized Controlled Trial
> > >
> > > PMID: 14676042 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
> > >
> > >
> >
>
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_ui
> > ds=14676042&dopt=Abstract
> > >
> > > ======================================================================
> > >
> > > Here'a an article on the study.
> > >
> > > ===============================================================
> > > Drug used to treat athlete's foot 'slows down Alzheimer's'
> > > By Michael Day and Martyn Halle
> > > (Filed: 11/01/2004)
> > >
> > >
> > > A drug that is used in the treatment of athlete's foot could be used
> > > to treat Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study by British
> > > doctors.
> > >
> > >
> > > Iris Murdoch, who died in 1999, and her husband John Bayley
> > > The study, by a team from University College, London, found that
> > > clioquinol, a drug that is also used to treat ear infections and
> > > indigestion, can almost halt the progression of Alzheimer's.
> > >
> > > It discovered that clioquinol, which was developed 100 years ago, is
> > > able to absorb the zinc and copper atoms that concentrate in the
> > > brains of Alzheimer's sufferers before dementia sets in.
> > >
> > > Doctors believe that by absorbing these atoms, clioquinol can arrest
> > > the onset of dementia, potentially helping thousands of people.
> > >
> > > Dr Craig Ritchie, a psychiatrist at UCL and a Medical Research Council
> > > research fellow who led the trial, said that the results were "very
> > > exciting".
> > >
> > > "The patients on this trial had Alzheimer's that was mild to moderate,
> > > but there was very little change in their brains once they had started
> > > treatment," he said.
> > >
> > > "This drug could give your mind a chance to stay healthy as long as
> > > your body does. Particularly for patients who get this terrible
> > > disease in middle age, we need better treatments."
> > >
> > > The study was prompted by research at Melbourne University in
> > > Australia and Harvard University in the United States, which found
> > > that clioquinol could prevent zinc from building up on the surface of
> > > the brain.
> > >
> > > Academics from the universities speculated that by blocking zinc they
> > > could halt, and possibly reduce, the brain damage that causes
> > > Alzheimer's victims to lose their memory.
> > >
> > > To test their theory, the UCL doctors tested 13 Alzheimer's patients,
> > > giving them clioquinol over a nine-month period, and 13 other
> > > Alzheimer's sufferers who were given a placebo.
> > >
> > > The results, published in the Archives of Neurology, show that
> > > patients given clioquinol retained significantly more mental capacity
> > > than those who received the placebos. Dr Ritchie said that the
> > > patients taking clioquinol experienced a decline in their mental
> > > faculties of just 1.4 per cent.
> > >
> > > "You would normally see a drop of four points or more in someone with
> > > Alzheimer's over the period of time we treated these patients," he
> > > added. "For those taking the placebo, their mental decline was 8.9 per
> > > cent. It's a very large gap and indicated that the drug was working."
> > >
> > > Alzheimer's affects one in 10 people over the age of 65, and almost
> > > half of those aged 85 and over.
> > >
> > > The protective effect of clioquinol appears to be nearly twice as
> > > great as that of the latest generation of Alzheimer's drugs, such as
> > > donepezil, which are expensive and not always widely available.
> > >
> > > A survey by Pfizer, the drug company, revealed last week that the
> > > availability of treatments, which cost up to £100 a month, varied
> > > sharply across Britain. In the worst area, Lothian in Scotland, less
> > > than £1 a head was spent on these drugs in the over-65 population
> > > compared with more than £10 a head in Northern Ireland.
> > >
> > > Clioquinol should be much cheaper because it is no longer protected by
> > > a patent.
> > >
> > > Prana Technology, an Australian drug firm, provided clioquinol for the
> > > first small trial. Larger trials of the drug are expected to start
> > > shortly and will include British patients.
> > >
> > > Dr Ritchie said that animal studies had suggested that the drug might
> > > even reverse the progress of the dementia - something that current
> > > treatments are unable to do.
> > >
> > > "We know that in mice the disease was reversed. Everyone is excited
> > > but this was only a small trial and we have to do a larger trial. We
> > > think this drug will produce the same results in extended trials with
> > > humans. If we can get to them early, we might be able to treat
> > > patients and leave them with very little damage to their brain."
> > >
> > > One fear over the long-term use of clioquinol is that it may damage
> > > peripheral nerves and the nerves in the eye. Dr Ritchie said his team
> > > found no evidence of this during their trial.
> > >
> > > Dr Susanne Sorensen, the head of research at the Alzheimer's Society,
> > > said: "The UCL research suggests that there may be a novel use for
> > > this already existing drug in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.
> > > But the trial is limited in its scale and we believe it would be
> > > valuable to see a larger scale trial.
> > >
> > > "The potential for new drugs that may interfere with or revert the
> > > progression of Alzheimer's disease gives hope to people with dementia
> > > and their carers."
> > >
> > > The plight of sufferers and their carers was brought home to millions
> > > two years ago when the film biography of the novelist Iris Murdoch was
> > > showered with awards for its touching and realistic portrayal of the
> > > writer's dementia.
> > >
> > >
> >
>
http://news.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2004/01/11/nalz11.xml&
> > sSheet=/news/2004/01/11/ixhome.html/news/2004/01/11/nalz11.xml
> > >
> > > =====================================================================
> > >
> > >
> > > --Hua Kul
> > > huaREMOVEkul at hotmail.com
> >
> >
>
>





More information about the Neur-sci mailing list

Send comments to us at biosci-help [At] net.bio.net