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weird bacteria - Update

Scott J. Coutts scott.coutts at med.monash.edu.au
Fri Mar 7 04:50:32 EST 2003


Oh, wait, did you say you inoculated from a site on the plate with no 
apparent colonies? In that case, I'd say definitely there is two types. 
If you could post a pic of the stain, that'd probably help, maybe using 
the 40x and 100x (with oil) objectives if possible.

Scott J. Coutts wrote:
> Trond Erik Vee Aune wrote:
>  >
>  > Scott J. Coutts wrote:
>  >
>  >> I agree that it should be stained.
>  >
>  >
>  > It took me some time to do the staining, but now it's done. I
>  > compared it with E.coli. It looks to be gram negative.
>  >
>  > I've also tried to separate the "swarmer" from the "colony former" by
>  >  inoculating from an area without any obvious colony growth and from
>  > a colony, but without success. In both cases I get the same growth as
>  >  described earlier. So maybe it is one strain after all?
>  >
> 
> Did you see more than one cell shape in the stain? Could you post a pic 
> of it from the microscope on the web (if you have the facilities)?
> 
>  >
>  > I'm still eager to do 16s sequencing, but first I need to separate
>  > them if there's more than one strain. Do you microbiologists have any
>  > idea to how I could separate them?
>  >
> 
> I'd recommend the 6% agar trick first of all. It will also make those 
> colonies smaller, too. Spread them onto a plate. I'm still not convinced 
> that you have two types. Do you have a dark field or phase contrast 
> microscope? (probably not if you're a genetics lab). You may see a 
> difference in the motility if you can look at them directly.
> 
>  >
>  > Actually a 16s sequencing would tell me if I have more than one
>  > genotype. But it would be better to establish this before ordering
>  > the primers. At least if there's an easy way to do this.
>  >
> 
> Well, even if you separate them (assuming there is actually two to be 
> separated), you're still going to need to order the primers... why not 
> order them anyhow (:
> 
>  >
>  > Thanks again for all your helpful suggestions!
>  >
>  > Trond Erik
>  >
> 
> 


-- 
Scott J. Coutts
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