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[Agroforestry] EtOH-CH4 pipeline conversion/corrosion

vjp2.at at at.BioStrategist.dot.dot.com vjp2.at at at.BioStrategist.dot.dot.com
Wed Jun 7 09:59:16 EST 2006


   Can EtOH be CHEAPLY converted back and forth to CH4?  

   EtOH is too corrosive for existing pipelines. All the corn in the USA
would only supply 10% of the EtOH to power our cars.  Cellulosic EtOH
requires an additional dextrochiralisation process. Simplex coal and biomass
gasification was developed by Hap Schulz during WW2.

   What's the economics at $10 $20, $40, $90 oil?  (Assume $90 oil for six
months in the near future, the life of $60 oil to be five years and a return
to $20 oil in fifteen years.) The panicmeisters are going to destroy this
process if they force you to bet on permanently high oil prices: You have to
assume the "windfall" that can be plowed back into R&D will only last like
seven years; maybe we need 20yr energy futures and other risk derivatives?

   I'm thinking there have to be conversion innovations (like using platinum
to convert kerosene to gasoline) that will only come with extensive use, and
hence accidents and experimentation. You should be able to take in anything
(corn silage, apple waste, garbage) and produce energy (EtOh, H2, CH4) as
essentially an "interconvetable triad".


http://www.fe.doe.gov/programs/powersystems/gasification
http://www.woodgas.com/gasification.htm
http://www1.eere.energy.gov/biomass/gasification.html



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   Vasos-Peter John Panagiotopoulos II, Reagan Mozart Pindus BioStrategist
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