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creating a good climate for women

Susan Jane Hogarth sjhogart at unity.ncsu.edu
Fri Jun 14 13:02:18 EST 1996


Bharathi Jagadeesh wrote:
> 
> Susan Hogarth writes
> :  _However_, the operative word in your post
> : > seems to me to be the term "private fellowships".
> : > Why shouldn't they make whatever conditions
> : > they want? (not _trying_ to be flippant here,
> : > I really don't understand). A gov't-supported
> : > fellowship would be different, of course.

> First, it is not true that "private fellowships" can
> make whatever conditions they want, since very few
> private fellowships are really private. They usually
> involve government approval or support in some way, even
> if only to the university at which they will be used.

Good point - I really don't have enough data to address
this. I really wonder how much this sort of "exclusion"
operates.

> And aside from whether it is legal, there is the more
> important question of whether it is right. And there,
> I suggest that it is, at the least, inappropriate to
> make selection criterion that are not relevant to the
> goals desired by the fellowship (i.e. doing good science).

True, but a private fellowship is a priveledge, not a right.
If the fellowship administrators are too damn stupid to 
look for the best scientists, that fellowship _ought_ to
become less desirable, as people realize they're sacrificing
talent for mobility.

> If the fellowships purpose is to foster cooperation among
> communities, encourage international cooperation, then
> the situation is different. But we do need to be careful
> to examine whether the rules are really directed to a
> specific goal, or merely exclusionary.

Ah - so you're against minority fellowships? Fellowships
for women only? You can't have it both ways, you know.

> Is evryone suggesting that it would be "right" (or unobjectionalbe)
> for private fellowships to use height, eye color, or
> physical attractiveness as a criterion for awarding a
> fellowship to do science?

I'm not sure about "everyone", but I think I agree with that.

-- 


Susan Jane Hogarth

"Luck is the residue of design." -- Freddy the Fish 

"Personally, I'm always ready to learn, although I do not always like being
taught." -- Winston Churchill

http://www4.ncsu.edu/~sjhogart/public/home.html



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