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Diffenbachia help

gardenlen ntbandit at globec.com.au
Thu Sep 16 15:14:20 EST 1999


In article <5BWD3.2757$f32.15139 at news4.atl>,
  "e.t." <emt1 at bellsouth.net> wrote:
> It is very humid here in Georgia.  Summertime temps average 90-100
and you
> get the additional 5-10 added for heat index.  Winters can go as low
as the
> low teens, but are usually in the high 20s to 30s.  The inside temps
at home
> are regulated around 78 in the winter, 68 in the summer.  Office
temps are
> probably about the same, but with flourescent lighting that
everything else
> just loves.
>
>  *pout* other people have diffs at the office that are flourishing.
Help!
>
those conditions are comparable with here in queensland so it must come
down to light or some sort of infestation, there is a possibility that
the potting medium may not be quiet right, i always use organic based
local produced formulas i don't buy the product from the larger
manufacturers as they just don't produce the good when growing indoors.

for watering try waiting until the soil has dryed to a depth equivalent
to to the length of your finger to the first knuckle, then place pot
and all into a container bigger than the pot so that you can fill with
water to the top level of the pot not over and soak water the plant as
needed (approx' once a week in summer), after soaking for about 1/2 to
1 hour drain and put back into position.

another rule of thumb that i tell people is 2 weeks inside and 5 weeks
outside keeps plants healthy and thriving. also in the office ensure
that the plant isn't getting any cold ac air blown on it ferns in
particular will not survive ac conditions like this.

len
> <ntbandit at globec.com.au> wrote in message
> news:XnTfN2mAdb86ZbopO=9+RTPxJOuY at 4ax.com...
> > On Tue, 14 Sep 1999 20:46:42 -0400, "e.t." <emt1 at bellsouth.net>
wrote:
> >
> > >How do you keep one of these things alive?  I have had them in dish
> gardens,
> > >individual pots, in high light, in low light, direct light,
indirect
> light,
> > >well watered, dried out in between.  Within a week, it starts
drooping,
> > >turning yellow, and then dies away, no matter what kind of care it
got.
> I'd
> > >stopped buying them because it seemed useless.  Then, a friend at
work
> got
> > >one as a gift.  Sure enough...well, I'm beginning to wonder if
there's a
> > >jinx present here!
> > >
> > >This has become an enigma now.  Does anyone have a diff success
story
> that I
> > >can try?  All the books, etc. have failed me.  I need to hear from
a
> person
> > >with a success story that I could try out!  Thanks...
> > >
> > g'day,
> >
> > well you've just about covered every scenerio.
> >
> > i don't have any problems growing them indoors or in the garden here
> > in queensland australia. in the winter months outside the leaves go
> > yellow but they get a full compliment of new leaves next summer,
they
> > grow in shaded well lit parts of the garden.
> >
> > indoors a well lit position and watered when the mix has started to
> > dry on top.
> >
> > maybe you could give me some more climatic information there may be
> > something there, or are you sure they are not getting infested with
> > mealy bugs, they seem to do this with ease when inside at times,
apart
> > from that i can't really offer much more but you can compare what i
do
> > to with what you do, can't see alot of difference myself.
> >
> > len
> >
> >
> >
> > - -
> > happy gardening
> > 'it works for me it could work for you,'
> > <http://www.globec.com.au/~ntbandit/>
> > alt' em address #1 <gardenlen at hotmail.com>
> > alt' em address #2 <ntbandit at my-dejanews.com>
> >
> > "old age and treachery will overcome youth and skill"
>
>

--
happy gardening
'it works for me it could work for you'
<http://www.globec.com.au/~ntbandit/>
"old age and treachery will overcome youth and skill"


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