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What wood is that.....dogwods with black berries...ours are red!

Michael L Roginsky d_micro at ix.netcom.com
Thu Apr 11 15:40:34 EST 1996


In <3-632-552-0-3168450d at cloud.net.au> barrie at cloud.net.au (Barrie
Partridge) writes: 
>
>       Greetings from Port Franklin, friendliest place in Oz!
>
>-=> Quoting d_micro at ix.netcom.com(Michael to All <=-
>
>       G'day Michael and Phlomis (I reply to the latter by e-mail),
>
> d_> In <4in7g4$1nr at newsbf02.news.aol.com> phlomis at aol.com (Phlomis)
> d_> writes:
> >
> >Can anyone help with identifying the wood referred to as being used
> for
> >javelin shafts in ancient time. it is described as <bois de
> d_> cornouiller>
> >in a French article quoting Xenophon.
>
>       I have a 1925 English translation of a French Flora by Gaston 
>       Bonnier.  In the French/English names equivalents it gives:
>                       Cornouiller sanguin = Dogwood.
>
>       A search under Dogwood produces Family = Cornaceae
>              Genus = Cornus        Species = sanguinea
>                   ditto            Species = mas (no common name)
>                   
>       Sanguinea has BLACK berries which arise from WHITE flowers 
>       which have appeared AFTER the leaves have sprouted.
>
>       Mas has RED berries which arise from YELLOW flowers which
>       appear BEFORE the leaves.  The fruit of Mas is listed as
>       "nutritive" (called "dogberry").
>
>       Both species bear the legend: "Wood hard, used for tools".
>       
>       Whether one or both of these were used for javelins looks like 
>       the toss of a coin - I can shed no further light on the 
>       subject.  This is the sort of apparently "useless information" 
>       I have tended to collect over the years.!!!!
>
> d_> Jim, I bet the wood had to be relatively dense and cure without
> d_> warping. This should narrow down your search. Definitely not
pine!
> d_> Micro.
>
>       If these wereFrom: d_micro at ix.netcom.com(Michael L Roginsky )
Newsgroups: bionet.plants
Subject: Re: What wood is that.....dogwods with black berries...ours are red!
References:  <3-632-552-0-3168450d at cloud.net.au>

In <3-632-552-0-3168450d at cloud.net.au> barrie at cloud.net.au (Barrie
Partridge) writes: 
>
>       Greetings from Port Franklin, friendliest place in Oz!
>
>-=> Quoting d_micro at ix.netcom.com(Michael to All <=-
>
>       G'day Michael and Phlomis (I reply to the latter by e-mail),
>
> d_> In <4in7g4$1nr at newsbf02.news.aol.com> phlomis at aol.com (Phlomis)
> d_> writes:
> >
> >Can anyone help with identifying the wood referred to as being used
> for
> >javelin shafts in ancient time. it is described as <bois de
> d_> cornouiller>
> >in a French article quoting Xenophon.
>
>       I have a 1925 English translation of a French Flora by Gaston 
>       Bonnier.  In the French/English names equivalents it gives:
>                       Cornouiller sanguin = Dogwood.
>
>       A search under Dogwood produces Family = Cornaceae
>              Genus = Cornus        Species = sanguinea
>                   ditto            Species = mas (no common name)
>                   
>       Sanguinea has BLACK berries which arise from WHITE flowers 
>       which have appeared AFTER the leaves have sprouted.
>
>       Mas has RED berries which arise from YELLOW flowers which
>       appear BEFORE the leaves.  The fruit of Mas is listed as
>       "nutritive" (called "dogberry").
>
>       Both species bear the legend: "Wood hard, used for tools".
>       
>       Whether one or both of these were used for javelins looks like 
>       the toss of a coin - I can shed no further light on the 
>       subject.  This is the sort of apparently "useless information" 
>       I have tended to collect over the years.!!!!
>
> d_> Jim, I bet the wood had to be relatively dense and cure without
> d_> warping. This should narrow down your search. Definitely not
pine!
> d_> Micro.
>
>       If these were used for tools they would have to cure with a 
>       straight grain: we are also told they were both HARD-woods so 
>       it seems we are on the right track.
>       
>           Tweet tweet!  Time to go back on my perch now!
>           Barrie, the Pear Tree Twit.
>
>
>... Mushroom: place where Esquimeaux practice sled-dog driving.
>~~~ Blue Wave/386 v2.20
>
Lets just call it non-warping straight grained hardwood. Walnut is very
hard and if it is cut a the sapling stage it makes a great javelin.
That holds true to the hickory sapling. Note...I said sapling. The
processed wood from old trees warps and cracks, but great for firewood.

Micro, alive and not a microbe...re: Julius Heinis, url
http://144.174.177.33/~Julius.html




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