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Evolution of gram-positive bacteria

Keith Robison robison at ribo.harvard.edu
Wed Dec 4 21:10:17 EST 1991


macbeth at cs.tu-berlin.de (Andreas Pahl) writes:

>Hi,

>I cloned and sequenced a protein from a gram-positive bacteria (streptomycete) and
>much more homology to yeast, fungi and mammalians than to E.coli. So my question
>is, what may be the reason for this? 

>The protein is highly conserved from human down to yeast (about 80% identity),
>but as fas as I know the split of eukaryotes and prokaryotes took earlier place
>than the split gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria.

>Bye, Andreas
>-- 
>###############################################################################
>Andreas Pahl                                email: macbeth at opal.cs.tu-berlin.de
>Institut f. Biochemie u. Molekulare Biologie       macbeth%opal at DB0TUI11.BITNET
>TU Berlin                                          macbeth%opal at DB0TUI11.EARN
>Franklinstr. 29                                           Tel. +49 30 314 24168
>D-1000 Berlin 10                                          Fax  +49 30 314 24783
>###############################################################################



You may have found a case of horizontal gene transfer from eukaryotes to
prokaryotes.  Take a look at:

Doolittle, RF, DF Feng, KL Anderson, and MR Alberro
A naturally-occurring horizontal gene transfer from a eukaryote to a prokaryote
Journal of Molecular Evolution
Nov 1990  31(5):383-385



Keith Robison
Harvard University
Program in Biochemistry, Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology

robison at nucleus.harvard.edu



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