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postdoc position

niyogi at nature.berkeley.edu niyogi at nature.berkeley.edu
Mon Apr 20 13:18:23 EST 1998


Postdoctoral Position
University of California, Berkeley

Postdoctoral positions are available to study responses of photosynthetic
organisms to excessive light.  The laboratory uses a combination of genetic
and physiological approaches to characterize Chlamydomonas and Arabidopsis
mutants defective in regulation of photosynthesis and/or antioxidant
metabolism.  Candidates are sought to join either of two ongoing research
projects.

One project is focused on Chlamydomonas mutants that are defective in
xanthophyll metabolism (Plant Cell 9: 1369-1380 [1997]), especially a
mutant lacking zeaxanthin and lutein that undergoes photo-oxidative
bleaching in high light (PNAS 94: 14162-14167 [1997] --
http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/full/94/25/14162).  Biochemical methods
will be used to characterize the types of oxidative damage and antioxidant
responses that occur in xanthophyll mutants compared to the wild type.  The
phenotypes of the xanthophyll mutants will be exploited to identify new
mutants affecting antioxidant metabolism in Chlamydomonas.

The second project concerns the dissipation of excess absorbed light energy
as measured by nonphotochemical quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence.  A
collection of Arabidopsis npq mutants that are defective in
nonphotochemical quenching has been isolated by digital video imaging of
chlorophyll fluorescence, and characterization of mutants that are impaired
in the xanthophyll cycle has confirmed the involvement of specific
xanthophylls.  However, several npq mutants have normal pigment composition
and therefore define molecules besides the xanthophylls that are required
for nonphotochemical quenching.  Molecular genetic and biochemical methods
will be used to identify the genes and proteins that are affected in these
novel mutants, and physiological characterization of the mutants will
enable critical assessment of the importance of nonphotochemical quenching
in photoprotection.

A strong background in molecular genetics and biochemistry is required.
Preference will be given to applicants with potential to obtain independent
funding.

To apply, send letter of application and CV and request that three letters
of reference be sent to:  Krishna K. Niyogi, Department of Plant and
Microbial Biology, 111 Koshland Hall, University of California, Berkeley,
CA 94720-3102, FAX (510) 642-4995, e-mail niyogi at nature.berkeley.edu.  A
brief overview of research in the laboratory can be found at
http://plantbio.berkeley.edu/Faculty/faculty_members/niyogi.html.






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