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Announce: Laboratory Robotics Meetings

Andy Zaayenga andy.zaayenga at bigfoot.com
Mon Dec 6 20:51:47 EST 1999


This notice contains information about the next meetings for LRIG Mid
Atlantic, LRIG San Diego, LRIG SouthEast, LRIG Bay Area, and LRIG New
England.

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The Laboratory Robotics Interest Group Mid Atlantic Chapter
December 1999 Meeting

High Throughput Screening Using the 1536-Well Format: 
Distinguishing Fact from Fiction

Date: Tuesday, December 7, 1999
Place: Hanover Marriott,1401 Rt 10 E, Whippany, NJ 07981
Phone: 973-538-8811, Fax: 973-538-0291
Itinerary: Social Period & Exhibition - 3:30 to 6:30 PM
Presentations - 6:30 to 8:00 PM
Panel Discussion - 8:00 to 9:00 PM
Registration: Requested, not required. Pre-registering will allow us to
more
accurately gauge seating requirements and refreshment needs. Indicate
names
of attendees and company affiliation. Pre-register by email with 
<mailto:andy.zaayenga at lab-robotics.org> or by phone at (732)302-1038. In
order to speed sign-in at the meeting, please bring a business card to
drop
into the registration box. There will be a business card drawing for a
PalmPilot IIIx donated by TekCel, www.tekcel.com.
 
Agenda: 
There will be a variety of vendors available exhibiting the latest
developments in laboratory automation hardware and software related to
1536-well and higher density formats during a social period (3:30 P.M. -
6:30 P.M.). Food and refreshments will be available, provided by LJL
Biosystems, www.ljlbio.com. 
This will be followed by three talks and a panel discussion. Members
interested in presenting a poster are encouraged to do so. Open career
positions at your company may be announced or posted. There is no
registration or fee associated with this LRIG function.
 
---------------------------------------

Exhibitors:
 	Amersham Pharmacia Biotech	
 	Beckman Coulter	
 	Becton Dickinson 	
 	BioSignal	
 	Cardinal Instrument	
 	Cellomics	
 	Corning	
 	CRS 	
 	EMAX Solution Partners 	
 	Genevac 	
 	Greiner America 	
 	IDBS	
 	LabVantage Solutions	
 	LJL BioSystems 	
 	Marsh	
 	MJ Research, Inc.	
 	Modern Drug Discovery	
 	Molecular Devices	
 	Nalge Nunc International	
 	Oyster Bay Pump Works 	
 	Packard	
 	Perkin Elmer Biosystems (Tropix division)	
 	Perkin Elmer Wallac	
 	Pierce Chemical	
 	Popper and Sons 	
 	Robbins	
 	Robocon 	
 	Tecan	
 	Tomtec	
 	Zymark	
 
---------------------------------------

Presentation: The Complete Solution to ultra-High Throughput Screening
Assay
Miniaturization.
David A. Dunn; Senior Research Fellow; Pharmacopeia, Inc. 
A complete solution to the challenges of assay development in
miniaturized 
format, including plate miniaturization, liquid handling, optical
detection,
data management and assay development, is required in order to implement
a 
viable uHTS program. This talk will cover new tools, developed at
Pharmacopeia and elsewhere, that address these challenges. Examples of
their
successful implementation as part of our regular screening operation
will be
given.
 
---------------------------------------

Presentation: An Ultra High-Throughput Approach for an Adenine
Transferase 
Using Fluorescence Polarization
Dr. Julie Li, Hoechst Marion Roussel
We have developed a novel assay for measuring the activity of an enzyme
that
transfers multiple adenine-containing groups to an acceptor protein. The
assay is based on fluorescence polarization (FP) technology in a
1536-well
plate format. In the assay, a long wavelength fluorescence tracer, Texas
Red
(Rhodamine), was covalently conjugated to adenine of the donor substrate 
through a C6 spacer arm. As a result of the transfer of the
adenine-containing moieties to the acceptor protein substrate, the
rotation
correlation time of the Texas Red conjugate increased, and hence the
degree
of fluorescence polarization. The pharmacological profile and kinetics
of
the enzyme measured according to the FP method were consistent with
those
determined previously by conventional analysis. We have successfully
executed a 250,000 compound high throughput screening program based on
the
FP assay method. The quality and validity of the assay were verified by
a
variety of statistical analyses. 

---------------------------------------
 
Presentation: Analysis of Protein-Peptide Interaction by a Miniaturized 
Fluorescence Polarization Assay Using Cyclin Dependent Kinase 2/Cyclin E
as
a Model System
Ilona Kariv, Sokhom S. Pin, and Kevin R. Oldenburg 
Leads Discovery, DuPont Pharmaceuticals, Wilmington, DE 19880
As a result of the increasing size of chemical libraries, more rapid and
highly sensitive strategies are needed to accelerate the process of drug
discovery without increasing the cost. One means of accomplishing this
is to
miniaturize the assays that enter high throughput screening (HTS).
Miniaturization requires an assay design that has few steps, has a large
degree of separation between the signal and background, and has a low
well
to well signal variation. 
Fluorescence polarization (FP) is an assay type that, in many cases,
meets
all of the above requirements. FP is a homogenous method that allows
interactions between molecules to be measured directly in solution. This
article demonstrates the application of FP to a miniaturized HTS format,
using 1536-well plates, to measure direct binding between cyclin
dependent
kinase 2/cyclin E complex (CDK2/E) and an 8-mer-peptide kinase
inhibitor.
The data indicate that low variability and high specificity allow rapid
and
precise identification of antagonist compounds affecting CDK2/E-peptide
interactions.

---------------------------------------
 
Panel: Following the talks, there will be a moderated panel discussion
with
HTS experts who are using 1536-well and higher density formats in their 
laboratories.
Panel members include:
David A. Dunn, Senior Research Fellow; Pharmacopeia
Dr. Julie Li, Hoechst Marion Roussel
Ilona Kariv, Leads Discovery, DuPont Pharmaceuticals
Daniel Chelsky, BioSignal
Jonathan Burbaum, Associate Director, Technology Business Development, 
Pharmacopeia
Meng Zhang, Applications Scientist, LJL

---------------------------------------
 
Poster: Fluorescence Detection Strategies for Electroseparations in
Plastic 
Micro-fabricated Devices
Shau-Chun Paul Wang, Department of Chemistry, University of Michigan, 
scwang at umich.edu
Fluorescence background interference from the device is inherent in
plastic 
microchips, particularly with blue or UV excitation. Conventionally,
microchip background has been reduced with confocal optics or
circumvented
with specialized long wavelength fluorophores. We show that microchip
background can be rejected with analyte velocity modulation. In this
scheme
the driving voltage is modulated at low frequency. Migration velocities
and
analyte signals are modulated at the same frequency. Microchip
fluorescence
is unmodulated, so that lock-in detection (synchronous demodulation)
easily
separates the analyte signal from background. The technique does not
require
a laser source. In our implementation a blue (485nm) LED is the light
source. Simple optics are used to shape the source and focus it to a
spot
about 50 microns in diameter inside a microchip. Photomultiplier
detection
is employed and a lock-in amplifier is used to demodulate the signal.
Apertures in the system generate a derivative response, which can be
converted to conventional bands by integration. Fluorescence rejection
provided by our first generation system lowers detection limits by five
to
eight fold compared to DC measurements with the same optical train. 
 
---------------------------------------

Poster: Corning 1536-Well Assay Plate for HTS
Arthur Trombley, Corning Inc. Science Products Division, Portsmouth, NH
USA
Jill Veilleux, Corning Inc. Science Products Division, Acton, MA USA
David Dunn, Marc Orlowski, Pharmacopeia, Inc., Princeton, NJ USA
Meng Zhang, Doug Boyd, LJL Biosystems, Inc., Sunnyvale, CA USA
The new Corning 1536–well 2 µl Plate provides the foundation for a
unique 
solution to assay miniaturization for high throughput screening. The
advantages of the 1536-well HTS plate include:
Conservation of 96 and 384 well format, which aids in sample transfer,
well 
identification, and data manipulation 
Low profile, which provides increased sample density over conventional
plate
height and reduces parallax effects in imaging systems 
Three point positioning and tight manufacturing tolerances for all
dimensions, 
which enable high-speed automated plate handling functions 
The lowest volume wells (2 µl) that are commercially available 
Optimized materials for manufacture, which enhance performance in
Fluorescence, 
luminescence and colorimetric detection formats. 
Here, we provide an analysis of evaporative loss and automated
dispensing at
low volumes. The Corning 1536-well 2 µl Plate is shown to be an ideal
solution to scale up from traditional 96 and 384 well formats in high
throughput 
 
---------------------------------------

Posters will also be presented by BioSignal and Perkin Elmer Tropix.

---------------------------------------
 
Directions: (on line directions at http://marriotthotels.com/EWRHO/):
Take Route 287 to Exit 39 (Route 10 West). Go through one stoplight and
take
1st u-turn. 

---------------------------------------

Detailed information may be found at
http//www.lab-robotics.org/Mid_Atlantic/meetings/9912.htm

****************************************

The Laboratory Robotics Interest Group San Diego Chapter 

Tuesday, December 7th, 630 - 930pm. 
Held in Garren Auditorium, Basic Science Building, UCSD Medical School,
La 
Jolla Campus. 
     
     Featuring presentations on the following 
     
     Tentative - Robots and DNA Mass Array Qualification - James E. 
     Kahelin. 
     
     Tentative - Discovery, Selection, and Early-Stage Development of
Novel 
     Small Molecule Drug Therapies - Kia Motesharei, Ph.D., Manager, New 
     Technologies, Trega Biosciences, Inc. 
     
     Automated Synthesizer utilizing Tilted Plate Centrifugation -
Michal 
     Lebl, Spyder Instruments, Inc. 

Detailed information may be found at
http//www.lab-robotics.org/San_Diego/

****************************************

The Laboratory Robotics Interest Group Bay Area Chapter 
Tuesday, December 7th, 630 - 930pm. 

Detailed information may be found at
http://www.lab-robotics.org/Bay_Area/

****************************************

The Laboratory Robotics Interest Group New England Chapter
Next meeting is March 8, 2000 

The topic is HTS: A Reality Check

Detailed information will be posted shortly to
http//lab-robotics.org/New_England/index.html

****************************************

The next meeting of the SouthEast Chapter of the Laboratory Robotics 
Interest Group (LRIG) is set for Friday, February 4, 2000 from 12 noon
to 6 p.m. at the Sheraton Imperial in Research Triangle Park, North 
Carolina. The meeting will consist of a vendor show and vendor
presentations.

Detailed information may be found at
http://www.lab-robotics.org/SouthEast/Feb4_2000.htm

****************************************
 
The Laboratory Robotics Interest Group is a rapidly growing special
interest
group focused on robotics applications in the laboratory. Our membership 
consists of over 5,000 scientists and engineers worldwide.

We are a non-profit organization run by unpaid volunteers for the
benefit of
the Laboratory Automation Community. Please visit our web site at 
http//www.lab-robotics.org/



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